Tuesday, 26 December 2017

Swami Vivekananda : Discovery of Real India

Swami Vivekananda, known in his pre-monastic life as Narendra Nath Datta, was born in an affluent family in Kolkata on 12 January 1863. His father, Vishwanath Datta, was a successful attorney with interests in a wide range of subjects, and his mother, Bhuvaneshwari Devi, was endowed with deep devotion, strong character and other qualities. A precocious boy, Narendra excelled in music, gymnastics and studies. By the time he graduated from Calcutta University, he had acquired a vast knowledge of different subjects, especially Western philosophy and history. Born with a yogic temperament, he used to practise meditation even from his boyhood, and was associated with Brahmo Movement for some time.

During his travels all over India, Swami Vivekananda was deeply moved to see the appalling poverty and backwardness of the masses. He was the first religious leader in India to understand and openly declare that the real cause of India’s downfall was the neglect of the masses. 
The immediate need was to provide food and other bare necessities of life to the hungry millions. For this they should be taught improved methods of agriculture, village industries, etc. It was in this context that Vivekananda grasped the crux of the problem of poverty in India (which had escaped the attention of social reformers of his days): owing to centuries of oppression, the downtrodden masses had lost faith in their capacity to improve their lot. It was first of all necessary to infuse into their minds faith in themselves. For this they needed a life-giving, inspiring message. Swamiji found this message in the principle of the Atman, the doctrine of the potential divinity of the soul, taught in Vedanta, the ancient system of religious philosophy of India. He saw that, in spite of poverty, the masses clung to religion, but they had never been taught the life-giving, ennobling principles of Vedanta and how to apply them in practical life.
Thus the masses needed two kinds of knowledge: secular knowledge to improve their economic condition, and spiritual knowledge to infuse in them faith in themselves and strengthen their moral sense. The next question was, how to spread these two kinds of knowledge among the masses? Through education – this was the answer that Swamiji found. 


Wanchoo Point: A Natural Hill Station near Indore

The hill area surrounded by the deep forest, Wanchoo Point is situated near Mhow The place has all the trappings of a natural hill-station. With rains having turned valleys verdant, Wanchoo Point has sprung up on MP State Tourism Development Corporation (MPSTDC) radar as potential tourism spot for people of Indore and adjoining areas, Wanchoo Point located atop hills on Narmada water supply route between Jalud and Indore and from where one can get a perfect view of Sun set, has always been a favorite destination for the picnic goers and lovers of scenic beauty.


Current Trends in Web Developement

Web development is a broad term for the work involved in developing a web site for the Internet (World Wide Web) or an intranet (a private network). Web development can range from developing the simplest static single page of plain text to the most complex web-based internet applications, social network applications and electronic business applications.




What is Mahcine Vision ?

According to the Automated ImagingAssociation (AIA), machine vision encompasses all industrial and non-industrial applications in which a combination of hardware and software provide operational guidance to devices in the execution of their functions based on the capture and processing of images. Though industrial computer vision uses many of the same algorithms and approaches as academic/educational and governmental/military applications of computer vision, constraints are different.
Industrial vision systems demand greater robustness, reliability, and stability compared with an academic/educational vision system and typically cost much less than those used in governmental/military applications. Therefore, industrial machine vision implies low cost, acceptable accuracy, high robustness, high reliability, and high mechanical, and temperature stability.
Machine vision systems rely on digital sensors protected inside industrial cameras with specialized optics to acquire images, so that computer hardware and software can process, analyze, and measure various characteristics for decision making.

As an example, consider a fill-levelinspection system at a brewery (Figure 1). Each bottle of beer passes through an inspection sensor, which triggers a vision system to flash a strobe light and take a picture of the bottle. After acquiring the image and storing it in memory, vision software processes or analyzes it and issues a pass-fail response based on the fill level of the bottle. If the system detects an improperly filled bottle—a fail—it signals a diverter to reject the bottle. An operator can view rejected bottles and ongoing process statistics on a display.

Figure 1. Bottle fill-level inspection example
Benefits of Machine Vision-
Where human vision is best for qualitative interpretation of a complex, unstructured scene, machine vision excels at quantitative measurement of a structured scene because of its speed, accuracy, and repeatability. For example, on a production line, a machine vision system can inspect hundreds, or even thousands, of parts per minute. A machine vision system built around the right camera resolution and optics can easily inspect object details too small to be seen by the human eye.
In removing physical contact between a test system and the parts being tested, machine vision prevents part damage and eliminates the maintenance time and costs associated with wear and tear on mechanical components. Machine vision brings additional safety and operational benefits by reducing human involvement in a manufacturing process. Moreover, it prevents human contamination of clean rooms and protects human workers from hazardous environments.

Search engine Optimization and Digital marketing by CrazyOnWeb a digital marketing company


Digital marketing is the marketing of products or services using digital technologies, mainly on the Internet, but also including mobile phones, display advertising, and any other digital medium

Digital marketing is often referred to as 'online marketing', 'internet marketing' or 'web marketing'. The term digital marketing has grown in popularity over time, particularly in certain countries, Digital marketing methods such as search engine optimization (SEO), search engine marketing (SEM), content marketing, influencer marketing, content automation, campaign marketing, data-driven marketing, e-commerce marketing, social media marketingsocial media optimizatione-mail direct marketing, display advertising, e–books, and optical disks and games are becoming more common in our advancing technology. In fact, digital marketing now extends to non-Internet channels that provide digital media, such as mobile phones (SMS and MMS), callback, and on-hold mobile ring tones.



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Prof. Sanjay Modi has Chaired Session in the 1st International Conference on Data, Engineering and Application jointly organized by RGPV Bhopal on 28-29 October 2017.

Prof. Sanjay Modi has Chaired Session in the 1st International Conference on Data, Engineering and Application jointly organized by RGPV Bhopal on 28-29 October 2017.

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Wednesday, 20 December 2017

Study Materials for aspirants


Vikrant Academy a renowned name of Gwalior comes up with digital concept for its students by providing e-notes/question papers free of cost. Students have to register once on www.vitm.edu.in (college’s Website) and they can download notes and previous year question papers for MPPSC, SSC-CGL, Railway, Bank, NEET, JEE and for other competitive examination. 

ALL THE BEST.

Tuesday, 4 July 2017

GST : Goods & Services Tax Concept


GST stands for “Goods and Services Tax”, and is proposed to be a comprehensive indirect tax levy on manufacture, sale and consumption of goods as well as services at the national level. Its main objective is to consolidates all indirect tax levies into a single tax, except customs (excluding SAD) replacing multiple tax levies, overcoming the limitations of existing indirect tax structure, and creating efficiencies in tax administration.
Simply put, goods and services tax is a tax levied on goods and services imposed at each point of sale or rendering of service. Such GST could be on entire goods and services or there could be some exempted class of goods or services or a negative list of goods and services on which GST is not levied. GST is an indirect tax in lieu of tax on goods (excise) and tax on service (service tax). The GST is just like State level VAT which is levied as tax on sale of goods. GST will be a national level value added tax applicable on goods and services.
A major change in administering GST will be that the tax incidence is at the point of sale as against the present system of point of origin. According to the Task Force under the 13th Finance Commission, GST, as a well designed value added tax on all goods and services, is the most elegant method to eliminate distortions and to tax consumption.
One of the reasons to go the GST way is to facilitate seamless credit across the entire supply chain and across all States under a common tax base. It is a tax on goods and services, which will be levied at each point of sale or provision of service, in which at the time of sale of goods or providing the services the seller or service provider can claim the input credit of tax which he has paid while purchasing the goods or procuring the service. This is because they include GST in the price of the goods and services they sell and can claim credits for the most GST included in the price of goods and services they buy. The cost of GST is borne by the final consumer, who can’t claim GST credits, i.e. input credit of the tax paid.
Example: A product whose base price is ₹ 100 and after levying excise duty @ 12%value of the product is ₹ 112. On sale of such goods VAT is levied @ 12.5% and value to the ultimate consumer is ₹ 126. In the proposed GST system on base price of ₹ 100 CGST and SGST both will be charged, say @ 8% each, and then the value to the ultimate consumer is ₹ 116. So, in such a case the industry can better compete in global environment.
For more information ....Click here

Monday, 12 June 2017

Demonetisation in India


On November 8, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi announced in a broadcast to the nation that Rs500 ($7.40) and Rs1,000 currency notes would no longer be recognized legally as currency. “Great,” said Corporate India, economic commentators, foreign investors, international think tanks and global rating agencies. “Masterstroke,” echoed the Confederation of Indian Industry (CII).
The aim behind the government’s action was to combat tax cheating, counterfeiting and corruption. Eliminating large denominations makes it harder to hide large amounts of cash. Modi noted that the move complements the country’s swachh bharat abhiyan (Clean India campaign). “For years, this country has felt that corruption, black money and terrorism are festering sores, holding us back in the race towards development,” he said. “To break the grip of corruption and black money, we have decided that the currency notes presently in use will no longer be legal tender from midnight tonight.” Added Finance Minister Arun Jaitley: “The goal of this is to clean transactions, [to] clean money.”
“This announcement appears to be the most significant change made by the Modi government to date,” says Girish Vanvari, partner and head (tax), KPMG in India. “Its impact could be even bigger than GST (the Goods and Services Tax which is still running the gauntlet of politicians).” Adds a report by Crisil, a global S&P company: “Tuesday’s move could change the face of the Indian economy, improve the government’s fiscal position and tax compliance. The size of the cash economy will shrink, as will black money generation avenues, because of the better cash-flow trail.”

Wednesday, 31 May 2017

Contract Administration

     1.CONTRACT
  •       A contract is a written or oral legally binding document between client and contractor .
  •       Historically, this was most commonly achieved through signatures.
  •       But with the advancement of electronic- commerce, the forms of acceptance have expanded to include various forms of electronic  signatures.
     2.TYPES OF CONTRACTS
a. Sales contract.
b. Purchase contracts.
c. Partnership agreements.
d. Trade contracts.
e. Construction contracts:-
(a)Percentage rate contract on S.O.R.
(b)Item rate contract.
(c) Lump- sum contract.
3.NEED OF CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION IN CONSTRUCTION 
PROJECT
It is the subset of contract management.
The luck of the projects  closely relates to the contracts rightly prepared.
Contract management and contract administration are the integral parts of any projector business in general.
Contract administration is the active management of relationship between the client and the contractor .
Over the full term of the contract to achieve the agreed standards right from beginning to the completion of the contract.
For more information about it, contact 

Prof. J. S. Kushwah

(Retd. Executive Engineer - PWD MP)

Head, Civil Department

Vikrant College, Gwalior